Archive for the ‘Map’ Category

Over 100,000 travel photos on Fuzzy Travel!

December 14, 2008

Since this weekend there are over 100,000 travel photos on Fuzzy Travel! To celebrate, and because we were curious about how that many photos would look if they were visualized on a map, we spent a couple of hours on that. And here’s the result:

Fuzzy Travel photo map

Each photo in the map stands for a single location, and the photo’s size is indicative for the total amount of photos that were assigned to that location. Here’s a larger version of the map.

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New Sidebar Widget: your Current Location

May 27, 2008

We’ve added a new widget that you can add to your travelogue’s sidebar: your “current location”. It displays a little map image with your current location (according to your plotted travel route). If you add it to your sidebar in the Member Area it’ll look something like this:

FuzzyMapper

December 29, 2006

The most frequent type of email I get from Fuzzy Travel users is: ‘Can you add these locations for me?’ The answer from now on is: yes I can, but so can you!! Via this blog post I’m introducing FuzzyMapper Beta, a Google Maps application that gives you visual access to the entire location database. It basically serves two functions:

The latter function is of course the most useful, and adding your own locations can be done quite easily. It works like this: fire up FuzzyMapper from within the Member Area, and zoom in to the country and region where you’d like to add a location that’s not yet in the database. Then, click on the spot where your missing location is at. Enter the location’s name and — voila! — the location has been added to the location database.

To clarify, here are some screenshots that detail the process of adding a location that was not yet in the location database, namely ‘Drochia’ in Moldova.

Step 1. Open FuzzyMapper by clicking on the colored markers (you’ll find these near every location input field in the Member Area):
fuzzymapper1.gif

Step 2. FuzzyMapper opens in a new screen. On the initial world map select the country you want to zoom to, which in this case is Moldova:
fuzzymapper2.gif

Step 3. Move and zoom on the country map until you’ve spotted the ‘missing location’. Then, click on the map on that spot, and a marker with an input field will pop up. Type in the location name (in this example Drochia):
fuzzymapper3.jpg

Step 4. Finally, hit the ‘Add location!’ button and the location will be added immediately to the location database.

View your trip in Google Earth

December 15, 2006

news_googleearth.jpg

If you’re a Google Earth user, here’s some good news. You can now export your travel map as a KML file so that you can view it in Google Earth (Google’s wicked program that allows you to explore the world on your PC). Your travel route and your journal entries are exported in the file, so it basically provides the same data as your online map. Of course Google Earth provides a lot more flexibility and many more features, such as the cool experience of flying over a 3D landscape (of which a snapshot is shown in the accompanying picture).

KMLSo where can you find that KML file? Well, you’ll notice a new small icon directly under your map, which looks exactly like the image to the left of this text. Clicking on that icon will open your travel map’s KML file in Google Earth. (Tip: give the ‘Play Tour’ option a try!)

We hope you and your visitors will enjoy this new Fuzzy Travel feature. And if you’re not a Google Earth user yet: I can highly recommend you to download and start using it! It’s a wonderful way of exploring the world from behind your computer. It shows even the most remote locations in great detail, and literally puts “the world’s geographic information at your fingertips”. Check out http://earth.google.com/ for more details.

Map markers

November 8, 2006

mm_20_red.png

If you have a lot of posts with locations assigned to it, the amount of markers can make your map seem a bit chaotic. To counter this, new, smaller, post markers are now shown on your map.

Also, if you have your map start position set to ‘automatic’, and your itinerary happens to cross the International Date Line, your map will from now on center correctly.